Top Challenger Tips and Tricks

 

Tip:47
HOAT & Oat Engine Coolants!

 

New for 2013 model year! 
See info at end of this tip for new 2013 Challenger OAT coolant spec changes. Chrysler has changed coolant spec for this 2013 model year and it is NOT compatible with HOAT (2009-2012) and probably will cause confusion unless you understand the differences between previous HOAT and newer OAT spec.  You cannot mix OAT with any brand of "GM Dexcool" or the regular green type anti-freeze.  Note the new purple dye color for the OAT coolant!

HAOT Coolant - Exactly same as dealer type but 50% cheaper is Zerex G-05® Antifreeze/Coolant.

Provides long life protection for new Ford and DaimlerChrysler vehicles Available at NAPA automotive and others.

(Mopar numbers for Zerex G05 which is the same brand Chrysler/Dodge uses. Mopar # 68029698AA-05066386AA)

 

System fill or adding coolant procedures explained in detail below;

 

 

Description: Description: Description: Zerex-G05.jpg

 

NOTE!  There is also:


Fina - Universal HOAT Coolant

http://www.finalube.com/Product_Data...ife_yellow.pdf

Artic Blend G-PLUS! It meets Chryslers HOAT specs (MS7170 and MS9769) requirements!

http://www.eetcorp.com/antifreeze/g-plus.htm

So now we have at least three brands that meet Chrysler OEM HOAT spec.

Arctic Blend® G-Plus antifreeze is dyed yellow so it can be used to top off any antifreeze without causing a color change.

NOTE: Is the coolant in question compliant to Chrysler HOAT specifications?


If you have any question about a HOAT "compatible" coolant, look on the container label (usually in fine print) and it will
have the compliance Spec from Chrysler MS 7170 (older) and Chrysler MS 9769 (newer).

The newer spec is MS 9769 and can be used in systems prior to 2001 (MS 7170) but not mixed.  You cannot mix older
GREEN anti-freeze with newer G-05 Ethylene Glycol but the newer spec can be used as a "replacement coolant" after a
complete system flush.  Still confused?  With the newer Dodge vehicles, the Zerex G-05 is Chrysler MS 9769 compliant

and safe to use with the factory fill.  Keep in mind the 50/50 ratio for best overall coolant protection.

 

Zerex G-05 can come in different dye color depending on vehicle and factory fill.

 

From http://www.englefieldoil.com/PDF/ZerexG-05QAs.pdf


"What vehicles use Zerex G-05 in the factory fill and what is the dye color?"

            1984 Mercedes and beyond (light yellow)
            1900 Deere and Company vehicles and beyond (green)

            2001 Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep and beyond (orange)
            2002 Ford, Lincoln and Mercury trucks and SUV's and beyond (yellow)
            2003 Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury automobiles and beyond (yellow)


From http://www.whitfieldoil.com/download...ineupChart.pdf

Ok, more on formulations.

 

Anti-freeze and dye colors?

 

The dye color of antifreeze has nothing to do with antifreeze formula or performance. Chrysler’s G-05 contains orange dye to distinguish it from a yellow dye antifreeze previously
used. Other users of G-05 have yellow or even blue dye. However, GM DexCool, a purely organic acid type, also has orange dye, and this has been a source of service industry
confusion.  Fiat’s OAT, although a different formula, also has orange dye and it has been used in early production of the Dodge Dart.

 

NOTE for 2013: The new 2013 model Chrysler OAT, however, will have a purple dye.


Chrysler Group's HOAT has purposely been dyed "Orange" and can look "pink" in different light/containers.
So, although it is dyed orange, it is NOT orange like other regular (GM-Dexcool) Orange coolants??? Wha?

Only in the US can this happen.

Here is more detailed info on formulations and types/brands/OEM spec's etc.
Lots of good coolant info and pages to read here: 
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...8/ai_n9453107/

 

 

SYSTEM FILL OR ADDING ADDITIONAL COOLANT

 

The use of aluminum cylinder blocks, cylinder heads and water pumps requires special corrosion protection.  Only Mopar® Antifreeze/Coolant, 5 Year/100,000 Mile Formula (glycol base coolant with corrosion inhibitors called HOAT, for Hybrid Organic Additive Technology) is recommended. This coolant offers the best engine cooling without corrosion when mixed with 50% distilled water to obtain to obtain a freeze point of -37°C (-35°F).  If it loses color or becomes contaminated, drain, flush, and replace with fresh properly mixed coolant solution.

 

CAUTION:

Do not use coolant additives that are claimed to improve engine cooling.

 

The use of aluminum cylinder blocks, cylinder heads and water pumps requires special corrosion protection. In order to maintain the required protection for these components and cooling system performance, only use the appropriate fluid (Refer to 04 - Vehicle Quick Reference/Capacities and Recommended Fluids - Description) when servicing the vehicle. This coolant offers the best engine cooling without corrosion when mixed with 50% distilled water to obtain a freeze point of -37° C (-35° F). If it loses color or becomes contaminated, drain, flush, and replace with fresh properly mixed coolant solution.

 

WARNING:

Make sure engine cooling system is cool before removing pressure cap or any hose.

Severe personal injury may result from escaping hot coolant. The cooling system is pressurized when hot.

 

NOTE:

Cooling system fill procedure is critical to overall cooling system performance.

 

1.  Close radiator draincock. Hand tighten only.

 

2.  Install engine block drain plugs, if removed. Coat the threads with Mopar® Thread Sealant with Teflon.

 

WARNING:

When installing drain hose to air bleed valve, route hose away from accessory drive belts, accessory drive pulleys, and electric cooling fan motors.

 

NOTE:

It may be necessary to install a bleed fitting on the 5.7L engine.

 

3.  Attach a 1.5 - 2 m (4 - 6 ft.) long 6.35 mm (1/4 inch.) ID clear hose to bleeder fitting

 

                    Bleed Valve Location (3.5L): Located on the lower intake manifold, left of center and below the upper intake plenum.

                  Plug Location (5.7L/6.1L): Located on the front of the water outlet housing at the front of engine.

 

4.  Route hose (2) away from the accessory drive belt, drive pulleys and electric cooling fan.
     Place the other end of hose (2) into a clean container. The hose will prevent coolant from
     contacting the accessory drive belt when bleeding the system during the refilling operation.

 

NOTE:

It is imperative that the cooling system air bleed valve be opened before any coolant is added to the cooling system. 
Failure to open the bleed valve first will result in an incomplete fill of the system.

 

5.  5.7L/6.1L ENGINE - Install a threaded and barbed fitting (1/4 - 18 NPT) into water pump housing.

 

6. Attach Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel to pressure bottle filler neck.

 

7. Using hose pinch-off pliers, pinch overflow hose (3) that connects between the two chambers of the coolant bottle (2).

 

8. Open bleed fitting.

 

CAUTION:

Do not mix coolants. If coolant is used other than specified, a reduction in corrosion protection will occur.

 

9. Pour the antifreeze mixture (Refer to 04 - Vehicle Quick Reference/Capacities and Recommended Fluids - Description)
    into the larger section of Filling Aid Funnel (the smaller section of funnel is to allow air to escape).
    For system capacity, (Refer to 07 - Cooling - Specifications) .

 

10. Slowly fill the cooling system until a steady stream of coolant flows from the hose attached to the bleed valve.

 

11. Close the bleed valve and continue filling system to the top of the Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel.

 

12. Remove pinch-off pliers from overflow hose.

 

13. Allow the coolant in Filling Funnel to drain into overflow chamber of the pressure bottle.

 

14. Remove Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel. Install cap on coolant pressure bottle.

 

15. Remove hose from bleed valve.

 

16. 5.7L/6.1L ENGINE - Install fitting into thermostat housing. Coat the threads with Mopar® Thread Sealant with Teflon.

 

17. Start engine and run at 1500-2000 RPM for 30 minutes.

 

NOTE:

The engine cooling system will push any remaining air into the coolant bottle within about an hour of normal driving.  As a result, a drop in coolant level in the pressure bottle may occur. If the engine cooling system overheats and pushes coolant into the overflow side of the coolant bottle, this coolant will be sucked back into the cooling system ONLY IF

THE PRESSURE CAP IS LEFT ON THE BOTTLE.  Removing the pressure cap breaks the vacuum path between the two bottle sections and the coolant will not return to cooling system.

 

18. Shut off engine allow it to cool down for 30 minutes. This permits coolant to be drawn into the pressure chamber.

 

19. With engine COLD, observe coolant level in pressure chamber. Coolant level should be within MIN and MAX marks.
     Adjust coolant level as necessary.

 

NOTE:

The coolant bottle has two chambers. Coolant will normally only be in the inboard of the two. The outboard chamber is only to recover coolant in the event of an overheat or after a recent service fill.

 

For additional information on Challenger Fill Spec's, Torque, Tools and Pictorials on drain, flush and fill procedures, CLICK HERE.

 

FAQ!

Q: I am a mechanic and am bewildered with the variety of antifreezes on the market. Is there a reference chart that summarizes what
antifreeze is right for the vehicles we see in the USA?

 

A: Yes, EET has developed a table that can guide the mechanic or do-it-yourselfer with antifreeze compatibility questions, see this Reference chart

 

 

2013 WARNING BELOW!

 

Heads up from user 'Sven' on the 2013 model year Challenger change!

 

The new coolant for 2013 Chrysler models - OAT not HOAT. This is not the same and is a complete change.


I did not know this until recently. but Chrysler switched from HOAT to OAT type coolant for the 2013 models.
Chrysler notes that they not interchangeable.  This means that you cannot MIX them!

NOTE: The new 2013 model Chrysler OAT, however, will have a purple dye.


"Chrysler switches to OAT antifreeze for longer service interval"
http://www.sae.org/mags/aei/mater/11284


Also mentioned in this Chrysler newsletter
http://starparts.chrysler.com/newsle...r_Oct_2012.pdf

 

Here is a link below to the Mopar fluids catalog which list the new coolant part numbers.

I do not know why Chrysler insists on similar labeling. It is very easy to grab the wrong jug.

http://starparts.chrysler.com/starlibrary/marketing/chemicals/chemicals.pdf